Review: The Admiral’s Daughter by Julian Stockwin


The Admiral's DaughterThe Admiral’s Daughter by Julian Stockwin
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My Thoughts and Comments on The Admiral’s Daughter by Julian Stockwin

From my last review you will all know that I came late to the books of Julian Stockwin and once again this is another of his rip-roaring yarns I have read out of sequence again you will all know the reason why but I’ll tell you again that my excuse is that being disabled and not always able to get out myself, Maureen is the one who saw this book on the shelf at Pimlico library. I have now started to order the books online so hopefully I will get to read the in some sort of sequence.

As I said this is another first-rate read for those of us who are keen on seafaring yarns in the Hornblower and Bolitho style

In this the eighth book of this series, Thomas Kydd and Nicholas Renzi return to England in 1803 after tumultuous episodes on the other side of the world to find England in peril of starvation and bankruptcy. Kydd is placed back in command of his beloved vessel, Teazer, but he barely has time to prep her for the sea when he is sent on an urgent mission. Smugglers, enemy privateers, and treacherous sea conditions await Kydd on his journey to northern France on the eve of war, but equally worrisome events are occurring ashore. A growing attachment to the admiral’s daughter curbs Kydd’s blissful reunion with Teazer and he is forced to make a terrible decision that may cause the end of his friendship with Renzi, or the end of his naval career.

The Admiral’s Daughter by Julian Stockwin is another super first-class yarn from this superb writer of the sea, crammed with twists and turns he manages to keep steady Kydd’s spell at sea and ashore well, along with his portrayal of life for Kydd in early nineteenth century England is spellbinding.

The further I read about Thomas Kydd, the more I connect to him and as I expected to I prized reading the seafaring chapters, which this master story-teller brings alive, pulling the reader into the location in a way that makes you to feel as though you are actually there.

Once again I find that I must recommend you all to read the narratives of Julian Stockwin a master teller of tales who with just a few words can transport you in your mind’s eye to a time and place long gone, but not forgotten, reading these stories are almost like travelling in a time machine.

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