Category Archives: M. K. Hume

Review: Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M K Hume


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Prophecy: Clash of Kings
Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M K Hume
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Prophecy, Clash of Kings by M. K. Hume

I have placed M. K. Hume on my favourite authors list; I find that her style of weaving a story is somewhat distinctive and brimming with detail and creativity. Her talent to place images of bloody battle scenes in your head and then to explain the subtle involvements in her characters interactions is simply inspirational, furthermore if you are searching for a story weaver who can give you images of bloody battles you won’t be let down.

An enthralling commencement to the legend of one of my favourite characters of ancient British myths and having read 2 books of the Arthurian trilogy, I am so pleased and excited that this trilogy returns back in time to the beginning of one of the most celebrated companionships in the chronicles of folklore.

Just what is this story all about?
The legend begins…The first book in a thrilling new trilogy from the author of the epic King Arthur series. In the kingdom of Dyfed, Vortigern, Celtic High King of Cymru and the North, rules in relative peace. Yet his choice of wife – a Saxon queen – fuels tension between the Saxon and Celtic tribes. In the town of Segontium, a boy is raised by his grandmother. The product of a brutal rape, he is spurned by his mother as a demon child. The boy is Myrddion – prince of the Deceangli and apprentice to a skilled healer. Far away, Vortigern oversees the resurrection of ancient Dinas Emrys. According to prophecy, the king will perish if the fort does not rise again. But the foundations refuse to hold and Vortigern needs the blood of a demon seed – a human sacrifice – to make the towers stand firm. Myrddion’s life is in danger. Yet the child has a prophecy of his own and a greater destiny to fulfil.

Battlefields, sorcerers, great kings, intrigue and the best characterisations of Merlin I have ever come across, M. K. Hume is just what this legend has been waiting for someone who can put flesh on the bare bones of the greatest British sorcerer in history.

This story-weaver can make you believe that such a man did live in Briton at this particular era in our history, in other words she has brought legend and myth to life.
I never thought that anybody could entice me away from the tales of Merlin from the likes of Bernard Cornwell on the contrary I was mistaken, M. K. Hume has done just that and, this first story about the life of Merlin is superb, the story moves at a fast pace along with a plot that is jam-packed with action and intrigue.
The story is relentless in keeping you trapped in the pages and giving you no respite from the exhilarating tale, Merlin and all the other characters come to life on the pages of this well woven tale of ancient Briton.

I urge you to read this book and the following 2 books of what I am sure will become the definitive work of the legend of Merlin.

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Review: King Arthur: Warrior of the West by M. K. Hume


King Arthur: Warrior of the West
King Arthur: Warrior of the West by M.K. Hume
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

As I said when I reviewed the first book in this trilogy “Dragon’s Child”, I have read and enjoyed Bernard Cornwell‘s Arthurian stories and Mary Stewart’s somewhat whimsical tales of Arthurian Legend. However I have to declare that M. K. Hume‘s Arthurian legend is a superb unorthodox account of one of the most treasured of British legends, she is up there with Bernard Cornwell and Conn Iggulden.
I find that her style of weaving a story is somewhat distinctive and brimming with detail and creativity. Her talent to place images of bloody battle scenes in your head and then to explain the subtle involvements in her characters interactions is simply inspirational, furthermore if you are searching for a story weaver who can give you images of bloody battles you won’t be let down.
It’s always good to come across another great historical series and this new trilogy from M K Hume looks set to be one. The first book follows the story of Arthur from childhood into manhood. Exciting, violent and bloody and full of historical facts to keep you gripped throughout.
This tale includes all the time-honoured elements of this legend but this weaver of tales presents us with an original, unsentimental and most crucially a quite plausible tale.
I’m not saying it’s perfect it’s different, a bit darker and if you want to read of Arthur of the Britons beneath the customary legend then M. K. Hume has given us that choice.
Anyhow to the book;
M K Hume grasps this legend by the scruff of its neck and arranges the story based on realism and logic by producing a young man who struggles to accept the fate that is his by heritage in a brutal and bloody age.
This the second book in an exhilarating, Arthurian trilogy that starts twelve long, bloody years, after Artor fulfilled his destiny and was crowned the High King of the Britons. Against all odds, Artor has united Celtic Britain and with a last great campaign, has banished the Saxon scourge. The legend of Camlann has begun. But even as Artor’s kingdom is at its zenith, even as he has succeeded in conquering all external threats to his rule, his kingdom is being undermined from within.
Not only is Artor betrayed by the one person he should be able to trust, he has also learned of appalling perversion at the heart of his kingdom. He must make a terrible choice. Does he commit a deed that leaves him open to comparison with the despotic Uther Pendragon, or does he let evil go unchecked? The burden of leadership, of power, now rests solely – and heavily – on Artor’s shoulders for Myrddion Merlinus, master tactician, guiding light for so many years, has left Artor to his fate. Could all that Artor has fought for, the destiny of Britain, be lost? Will Britain be torn apart? Arthur (Artor) is now High King and takes revenge on the Saxons for the murder of his envoys.
Merlin (Myrddion) arranges a marriage for Arthur with the beautiful (but spoilt and dim – sounds very 21st Century WAG!) Guenevere (Wenhaver).
The beautiful and bewitching Nimue arrives (and in this version of the legend is one of the good people). At this point it all goes horribly wrong… but such is the way of legend.

The tale itself is agreeably narrated however after the opening violent) battle with the Saxons, we are left with a kind of peace for the country which doesn’t really seem right (Hence only 4 stars).
The tale then adheres to the Queen and her horrendous peevishness rather than keeping to Arthur and his task of the organising his army, knights and country and even though I enjoyed this book I found it more of a romantic fiction than a new and terrible vision of the Arthurian legend.
I imagine that, being the second book of the trilogy, we will have to wait for the third to come back to what I would think to be a horrendous ending that will certainly overcome Artor.
All in all it was a good read that left me wanting more, I just hope that the third and final part of this new version of Arthur of the Briton’s has more of Arthur and less of messed up, ill-tempered women!

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Review: King Arthur: Dragons Child by M. K Hume


King Arthur: Dragons Child
King Arthur: Dragons Child by M. K. Hume
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I have read and enjoyed Bernard Cornwell‘s Arthurian stories and Mary Stewart’s somewhat whimsical tales of Arthurian Legend. However I have to declare that M. K. Hume’s Arthurian legend is a superb unorthodox account of one of the most treasured of British legends.
This tale includes all the time-honoured elements of this legend but this weaver of tales presents us with an original, unsentimental and most crucially a quite plausible tale.
I’m not saying it’s perfect it’s different, a bit darker and if you want to read of Arthur of the Britons beneath the customary legend then M. K. Hume has given us that choice.
I have placed M. K. Hume on my favourite authors list; I find that her style of weaving a story is somewhat distinctive and brimming with detail and creativity. Her talent to place images of bloody battle scenes in your head and then to explain the subtle involvements in her characters interactions is simply inspirational, furthermore if you are searching for a story weaver who can give you images of bloody battles you won’t be let down.
Anyhow to the book;
Uther Pendragon, High King of Britain, is dying. As he weakens, Britain is being torn apart by the squabbling of kings. Only one man can bring them together. This is the legend of Artorex, the man destined to be King Arthur. Artorex, tall for his years, is growing up in the household of Lord Ector. Artorex was sent here by the Bishop of Glastonbury when he was but a babe in arms and, although his parentage is unknown, life has been unremarkable. That is, until the arrival of three men who arrange for him to be trained in the skills of the warrior; blade and shield, horse and fire; pain and bravery. By the time the men return, Artorex is both a father and a warrior — and married to Lady Gallia. The country is in a desperate state — Londinium is about to fall to the Saxons and Artorex is needed to help fight their advance. But to do so, he must leave his wife and family in the care of others. In an act of appalling treachery, they are slaughtered. But despite his terrible grief, Artorex’s destiny is set. He launches into a campaign of battle against the Saxon hordes, earning himself the trust of all men, and proving himself to be the only worthy successor to Uther. But Uther cannot accept Artorex’s role and hides his sword and crown. If Artorex is to unite the kings and fulfil his destiny, he needs the weapon destined to be worn by the High King of the Britons. Can he find the embittered Uther’s hiding place? The future of Britain is at stake
Dragon’s Child is the first book of the King Arthur trilogy and covers Artorex’s childhood and early adulthood up to the time when he discovers Uther’s crown and sword and is crowned High King and I find myself looking forward to the next two in this trilogy.

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